p1

Officers Hendry and Moore Sworn In

Officers Hendry and Moore Sworn In


 


Idaho Falls Mayor Rebecca Casper officially swore in the city’s newest police officers, Chris Hendry and Coleman Moore, in council chambers on Monday.


“You’re joining a force that has a reputation for providing a safe community,” Mayor Casper said during the ceremony. “It’s up to you that every positive association that the community has with seeing a uniform continues to be a positive association in their mind.”


Officer Moore, who graduated from Bonneville High School in 2003, has worked many years in law enforcement. He worked as a juvenile detention officer at the 3B Detention Center and for the last two years as a dispatcher at the Idaho Falls Bonneville County Dispatch Center.


He said he’s looking forward now to making the switch from the job as a dispatcher to a police officer.


“It’s an opportunity now to get more face-to-face with people and being able to follow-up and see calls through to the end,” he said.


Moore is a member of the Idaho National Guard. He is also a 2011 graduate from Brigham Young University-Idaho with his bachelor’s in emergency services administration.


He and his wife, Ashley, of 10 years have three children and a baby due in November.


Officer Hendry, who is a native of Georgia, also started his work at IFPD as a dispatcher at the Idaho Falls Bonneville County Dispatch Center. He was hired in April 2013.


Hendry said he’s always strived to work in law enforcement.


“I just feel like I need to do something to contribute to the community,” he said. “I value the freedoms we have and I wanted to do something to defend those freedoms.”


Hendry is a member of the Army Reserves. He graduated from the University of Phoenix in 2013 with his bachelor’s in business administration. He is currently working on his master’s in criminal justice at the University of Phoenix.


He and his wife, Sarah, of eight years have two children.


 


###


 



Officers Hendry and Moore Sworn In

Read more
p1

IFPD Changes

I’ve been meaning to blog for a while now. There is certainly a lot of things happening at the IFPD that are worth a mention.


First of all, the IFPD said many goodbyes this summer as we had 7 police officers retire. Sgt. Phil Grimes, detectives Curtis Bateman, Steve Barnes, Brent Lawrence and officers Mark Burnell, Kevin Pettingill and Lynn Case all retired. I blogged about some of those retirements earlier.


_DSC1567 Kevin Pettingill


_DSC1873 Brent Lawrence


June 25, 2013 007 Mark Burnell


20140704_063052 Lynn Case


June 2014 Retirements 083 Steve Barnes, Phil Grimes & Curtis Bateman


That was 210 years of experience that left the department. We’re certainly happy for them as they enter retirement, but they will be missed.


With retirements comes of course the opportunity to fill positions with new hires. Thankfully, after the budget process we were able to fill all of our vacant positions.


We were able to hire three people right away. Jon Baird was sworn in on Aug. 25 and is currently attending the Idaho POST academy in Meridian.


Baird Swearing-in 182-2 Officer Jon Baird


Next Monday, Sept. 22, we’ll swear in Coleman Moore and Chris Hendry (both of whom currently work for the IFPD as dispatchers).


All three are great new hires!


In August we also had 100 people that took the civil service test and then the top 32 people from the test went through the panel interview and agility test. From these candidates will fill the remaining vacant positions.





As I write this, the chief and the captains are interviewing perspective new officer hires. We could have some good news in the next coming weeks!


Along with the retirements and hires, there was a shake-up with captain assignments in August. Capt. Clements is now overseeing patrol, Capt. Cook is overseeing detectives and Capt. Cawley is overseeing IFPD services (animal control, dispatch, training and records).


This will hopefully be a great way to allow for different perspectives on how divisions are operated.


Anyway….as you can tell it’s been a busy summer here at the IFPD!



IFPD Changes

Read more
p1

I’ve been meaning to blog for a while now. There is certainly a lot of things happening at the IFPD that are worth a mention.


First of all, the IFPD said many goodbyes this summer as we had 7 police officers retire. Sgt. Phil Grimes, detectives Curtis Bateman, Steve Barnes, Brent Lawrence and officers Mark Burnell, Kevin Pettingill and Lynn Case all retired.


That was 210 years of experience that left the department. We’re certainly happy for them as they enter retirement, but they will be missed.


With retirements comes of course the opportunity to fill positions with new hires. Thankfully, after the budget process we were able to fill all of our vacant positions.


We were able to hire three people right away. Jon Baird was sworn in on Aug. 25 and is currently attending the Idaho POST academy in Meridian. Next Monday, Sept. 22, we’ll swear in Coleman Moore and Chris Hendry (both of whom currently work for the IFPD as dispatchers).


All three are great new hires!


In August we also had 100 people that took the civil service test and then the top 32 people from the test went through the panel interview and agility test. From these candidates will fill the remaining vacant positions.


As I write this, the chief and the captains are interviewing perspective new officer hires. We could have some good news in the next coming weeks!


Along with the retirements and hires, there was a shake-up with captain assignments in August. Capt. Clements is now overseeing patrol, Capt. Cook is overseeing detectives and Capt. Cawley is overseeing IFPD services (animal control, dispatch, training and records).


This will hopefully be a great way to allow for different perspectives on how divisions are operated.


June 2014 Retirements 083 Retirees Detective Steve Barnes, Sgt. Phil Grimes & Detective Curtis Bateman


June 25, 2013 007 Officer Mark Burnell


_DSC1567 Officer Kevin Pettingill


_DSC1873 Detective Brent Lawrence


20140704_063052 Traffic Officer Lynn Case


Anyway….as you can tell it’s been a busy summer here at the IFPD!



Read more
p1

Saying Goodbye

June 2014 Retirements 077 L to R: Officer Murray, Det. Barnes, Sgt. Grimes, Det. Bateman, & Officer Cosens. Not pictured: Officer Burnell.


This is a late post — by a couple of weeks. But, I still wanted to make sure a note was posted. A couple of weeks ago we honored four retiring officers. It’s always a bittersweet moment when we celebrate a retirement. You’re sad they’re leaving, but also excited for their accomplishment (there’s probably a little dose of jealousy too!).


Happy Retirement Sgt. Phil Grimes, Det. Steve Barnes, Det. Curtis Bateman and Officer Mark Burnell! We wish them the best!


Here’s some career highlights:


Sgt. Grimes started at the IFPD in September 1984. He worked in patrol and investigations during his career. He was promoted to the rank of sergeant in December 2006. He served as the Public Information Officer between 2009 and 2011. During his career he work many high-profile cases and homicides, including the Angie Dodge homicide case for which he received a Commander’s Commendation. He was also awarded Officer of the Month and Employee of the Month In December 2004 and October 2006.


Officer Barnes started at the IFPD in November 1983. He worked in patrol, detectives and as a school resource officer at Eagle Rock Junior High. He is also the longest serving officer in the investigations division with 20 years. Barnes is considered a guru in financial crimes and arson investigations. He has several arson and $100,000-plus embezzlement convictions.


Officer Bateman started at the IFPD in August 1984. He has worked in animal control, patrol, investigations and was a member of the IFPD SWAT team. He was also involved with Crimestoppers. He received Commander’s Commendations in 2003 and 2010 as a result of his excellent investigative skills. He was also Officer of the Year in 1996.


Officer Burnell started at the IFPD in September 1987. His police career has included service in the IFPD patrol division and airport security at the Idaho Falls Regional Airport. He is also a certified Idaho POST instructor and a former member of the IFPD SWAT team. Burnell received Officer of the Month in March 2000 and Employee of the Month in June 2007 for his work. He was also recognized in 1999 for his efforts during a response to a house fire that killed three children.


 



Saying Goodbye

Read more
p1

Reflections

I recently reached my one year mark as Idaho Falls’ Chief of Police.  I continue to be deeply honored and yet humbled with this opportunity. As an agency we are working hard to keep up with current crime trends to remain efficient in our approach in solving crimes and making a safer community.   


I am surrounded by a great staff, particularly by the people in executive command positions that oversee each division of the department who ensure we are doing our best.  This comes from constant evaluation of policies, procedures, ordinances, and best practices that are put in place to meet our mission; The Idaho Falls Police Department strives to create an environment free from crime and disorder through efficient service and valuable community collaboration. We are also striving toward our 


Walk a Mile 2013 002


vision, A Community safe from crime and disorder.  Our primary values are integrity, professionalism, respect and trust.   


To fulfill our mission and vision we’ve completed many different tasks.


Staffing studies were completed to best determine the number of officers needed to most efficiently respond to the current needs of our community.  These studies included reviewing our supervisory staffing needs and preparing an annual budget that came in below the previous fiscal year while absorbing some increased expenses and implementing a more efficient accounting system of revenue at the animal shelter.


Dedicated staff created a new look on the department webpage and are working on a media plan to keep the public updated on the most recent events of the police department.  Alert ID was launched for the purpose of keeping the public informed of crimes in their neighborhoods which also provides crime prevention tips.


The basic underpinning of all police work is the public trust.  We continue to interact with the public through our citizen’s academy, community night out, neighborhood watch, volunteer services, and in many other ways.


Safety of this community is our number one priority.  The three most important tenets of creating a safer community are; prevention, education, and enforcement.  Officers work hard to find new ways to prevent crimes.  While education for the officers in latest crime trends is important; it is just as important to educate the public.  Enforcement of the law by the officers not only acts as a deterrent to crime but is also used to educate offenders of the dangers their actions are to the community.  DARE Pledge 001



Reflections

Read more
p1

100 Years

Chief Mark McBride presents his uncle Leland McPhee with an honorary IFPD badge during his 100th birthday celebration. Chief Mark McBride presents his uncle Leland McPhie (a retired captain from the San Diego County Sheriff’s Department) with an honorary IFPD badge during his 100th birthday celebration.


Chief Mark McBride had the pleasure of attending the 100th birthday celebration of his uncle, retired San Diego Sheriff’s Captain Leland McPhie, in San Diego on Monday.


Leland McPhie worked as a at the San Diego Sheriff’s Department from 1940 to 1969. At the age of 40 he became the youngest person to ever to be promoted to captain. The celebration was hosted by the San Diego Sheriff’s Department at the Sheriff’s Museum in Old Town San Diego. March 10th was also declared “Leland McPhie Day” in San Diego County.


Mark was glad to attend the celebration and even presented his uncle with a special honorary IFPD police badge as a token for his 100th birthday.


 


 



100 Years

Read more
p1

Emergency Communication

By Joelyn Hansen


Students work as a team during the emergency communications exercise.[/caption]

It’s no surprise that I love to talk about communication. So, it’s no surprise that I would enjoy communications training.


In early January I attended a week-long training for public information officers at the Emergency Management Institute in Emmitsburg, Maryland. The training was specifically geared for teaching about operating an emergency communication system.


In the event there is an emergency situation – earthquake, major accident, flooding, etc. – there would be a dire and important need to make sure emergency responders are communicating any information to the public.


It will be up to the PIOs to make sure residents know what’s going on, what to expect, and ultimately how to respond in an emergency. It’s also important that the public is able to communicate their needs to the emergency operations center.


All this information will be expected to flow in and out of the emergency operations center with the help of the PIOs.  Not always an easy task considering how much information there may be in an emergency.


In fact, in our first pre-exercise for our big training exercise, I’d say we failed as there was a bottleneck of information. But, luckily, we figured it out, made some adjustments and information flowed smoothly.


[caption id=”attachment_1950″ align=”alignright” width=”300″> 20140109_170559 The Emergency Management Institute campus once was the location of the first girls parochial school in the U.S.


Training is really important and this training proved to be worth it. I learned a lot. Hopefully, I’ll be able to continue practicing and applying skills – just hopefully not in a real-life situation anytime soon.


By the way, the campus the training was held has an interesting history. It started out as a Catholic girls’ school (St. Joseph’s Academy) opened by Mother Seton in 1809, making it the first parochial school for girls in the U.S.



Emergency Communication

Read more